Research Papers: Imaging

Microvascular quantification based on contour-scanning photoacoustic microscopy

[+] Author Affiliations
Chenghung Yeh

Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Optical Imaging Laboratory, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri 63130, United States

Brian Soetikno

Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Optical Imaging Laboratory, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri 63130, United States

Song Hu

Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Optical Imaging Laboratory, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri 63130, United States

University of Virginia, Department of Biomedical Engineering, PO Box 800759, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908, United States

Konstantin I. Maslov

Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Optical Imaging Laboratory, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri 63130, United States

Lihong V. Wang

Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Optical Imaging Laboratory, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri 63130, United States

J. Biomed. Opt. 19(9), 096011 (Sep 15, 2014). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.19.9.096011
History: Received June 9, 2014; Revised August 21, 2014; Accepted August 27, 2014
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Abstract.  Accurate quantification of microvasculature remains of interest in fundamental pathophysiological studies and clinical trials. Current photoacoustic microscopy can noninvasively quantify properties of the microvasculature, including vessel density and diameter, with a high spatial resolution. However, the depth range of focus (i.e., focal zone) of optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) is often insufficient to encompass the depth variations of features of interest—such as blood vessels—due to uneven tissue surfaces. Thus, time-consuming image acquisitions at multiple different focal planes are required to maintain the region of interest in the focal zone. We have developed continuous three-dimensional motorized contour-scanning OR-PAM, which enables real-time adjustment of the focal plane to track the vessels’ profile. We have experimentally demonstrated that contour scanning improves the signal-to-noise ratio of conventional OR-PAM by as much as 41% and shortens the image acquisition time by 3.2 times. Moreover, contour-scanning OR-PAM more accurately quantifies vessel density and diameter, and has been applied to studying tumors with uneven surfaces.

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© 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Chenghung Yeh ; Brian Soetikno ; Song Hu ; Konstantin I. Maslov and Lihong V. Wang
"Microvascular quantification based on contour-scanning photoacoustic microscopy", J. Biomed. Opt. 19(9), 096011 (Sep 15, 2014). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.19.9.096011


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