Research Papers: Sensing

Clinical study of noninvasive in vivo melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers using multimodal spectral diagnosis

[+] Author Affiliations
Liang Lim

University of Texas at Austin, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 107 W. Dean Keeton Street C0800, Austin, Texas 78712, United States

Brandon Nichols, Narasimhan Rajaram, Mia K. Markey, James W. Tunnell

University of Texas at Austin, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 107 W. Dean Keeton Street C0800, Austin, Texas 78712, United States

Michael R. Migden

University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Dermatology, 6655 Travis Street Suite 650, Houston, Texas 77030, United States

Jason S. Reichenberg

University of Texas Southwestern-Austin, Department of Dermatology, 601 E 15th Street, Austin, Texas 78701, United States

Merrick I. Ross

University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Surgical Oncology, 1400 Pressler Unit #1484, Houston, Texas 77030, United States

J. Biomed. Opt. 19(11), 117003 (Nov 06, 2014). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.19.11.117003
History: Received May 21, 2014; Revised September 21, 2014; Accepted October 2, 2014
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Abstract.  The goal of this study was to determine the diagnostic capability of a multimodal spectral diagnosis (SD) for in vivo noninvasive disease diagnosis of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. We acquired reflectance, fluorescence, and Raman spectra from 137 lesions in 76 patients using custom-built optical fiber-based clinical systems. Biopsies of lesions were classified using standard histopathology as malignant melanoma (MM), nonmelanoma pigmented lesion (PL), basal cell carcinoma (BCC), actinic keratosis (AK), and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Spectral data were analyzed using principal component analysis. Using multiple diagnostically relevant principal components, we built leave-one-out logistic regression classifiers. Classification results were compared with histopathology of the lesion. Sensitivity/specificity for classifying MM versus PL (12 versus 17 lesions) was 100%/100%, for SCC and BCC versus AK (57 versus 14 lesions) was 95%/71%, and for AK and SCC and BCC versus normal skin (71 versus 71 lesions) was 90%/85%. The best classification for nonmelanoma skin cancers required multiple modalities; however, the best melanoma classification occurred with Raman spectroscopy alone. The high diagnostic accuracy for classifying both melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer lesions demonstrates the potential for SD as a clinical diagnostic device.

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© 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Liang Lim ; Brandon Nichols ; Michael R. Migden ; Narasimhan Rajaram ; Jason S. Reichenberg, et al.
"Clinical study of noninvasive in vivo melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers using multimodal spectral diagnosis", J. Biomed. Opt. 19(11), 117003 (Nov 06, 2014). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.19.11.117003


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