JBO Letters

Use of intracranial and ocular thermography before and after arteriovenous malformation excision

[+] Author Affiliations
Peter Y. K. Hwang

The Alfred Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Level 1, Old Baker Building, Prahran VIC 3188, Melbourne 3004, Australia

Monash University, Central Clinical School, Department of Surgery, Melbourne 3004, Australia

Philip M. Lewis

The Alfred Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Level 1, Old Baker Building, Prahran VIC 3188, Melbourne 3004, Australia

Monash University, Central Clinical School, Department of Surgery, Melbourne 3004, Australia

Monash University, Monash Institute of Medical Engineering, Melbourne 3004, Australia

Jerome J. Maller

The Alfred Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Level 1, Old Baker Building, Prahran VIC 3188, Melbourne 3004, Australia

Monash University, Central Clinical School, Department of Surgery, Melbourne 3004, Australia

Monash University, Monash Institute of Medical Engineering, Melbourne 3004, Australia

Monash University, Central Clinical School, Monash Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, Melbourne 3004, Australia

J. Biomed. Opt. 19(11), 110503 (Nov 18, 2014). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.19.11.110503
History: Received July 30, 2014; Accepted October 28, 2014
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Abstract.  Excision of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) is known to carry a risk of postoperative hemorrhage, postulated to be the result of normal perfusion pressure breakthrough. It is also possible that AVMs may cause a steal effect, reducing perfusion in nearby vessels. There is currently no simple method of visualizing the presence or absence of steal effect intraoperatively. We hypothesized that the infrared thermographic (heat sensitive) imaging of perilesional brain may be useful for detecting reduced perfusion due to steal. Moreover, we hypothesized that if steal effect was present, it could impact on ocular perfusion and thereby temperature. Our objective was, therefore, to investigate whether perilesional cortical and ocular temperature (OT) may be a marker of steal effect. We intraoperatively acquired conventional and thermal images of the surgical field and eyes bilaterally, pre- and post-excisions of a large left hemisphere AVM. We found OT asymmetry preoperatively, which was absent after the AVM was excised. Intraoperative thermal images showed an increase of perilesional temperature, although this could be confounded by generalized changes in cortical perfusion due to anesthetics or surgery.

Figures in this Article
© 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Peter Y. K. Hwang ; Philip M. Lewis and Jerome J. Maller
"Use of intracranial and ocular thermography before and after arteriovenous malformation excision", J. Biomed. Opt. 19(11), 110503 (Nov 18, 2014). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.19.11.110503


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