Special Section on Laser Applications in Life Sciences

Antibacterial effect of ultrafine nanodiamond against gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli

[+] Author Affiliations
Anindita Chatterjee

National Dong Hwa University, Department of Physics, 1, Sec. 2, Da-Hsueh Road, Shoufeng, Hualien 97401, Taiwan

Elena Perevedentseva

National Dong Hwa University, Department of Physics, 1, Sec. 2, Da-Hsueh Road, Shoufeng, Hualien 97401, Taiwan

Mona Jani

National Dong Hwa University, Department of Physics, 1, Sec. 2, Da-Hsueh Road, Shoufeng, Hualien 97401, Taiwan

Chih-Yuan Cheng

National Dong Hwa University, Department of Physics, 1, Sec. 2, Da-Hsueh Road, Shoufeng, Hualien 97401, Taiwan

Ying-Siou Ye

National Dong Hwa University, Department of Physics, 1, Sec. 2, Da-Hsueh Road, Shoufeng, Hualien 97401, Taiwan

Pei-Hua Chung

National Dong Hwa University, Department of Physics, 1, Sec. 2, Da-Hsueh Road, Shoufeng, Hualien 97401, Taiwan

Chia-Liang Cheng

National Dong Hwa University, Department of Physics, 1, Sec. 2, Da-Hsueh Road, Shoufeng, Hualien 97401, Taiwan

J. Biomed. Opt. 20(5), 051014 (Dec 15, 2014). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.20.5.051014
History: Received September 1, 2014; Accepted October 21, 2014
Text Size: A A A

Abstract.  We investigate the antibacterial effect of ultrafine nanodiamond particles with an average size of 5 nm against the gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli). UV-visible, Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have been employed to elucidate the nature of the interaction. The influence on bacterial growth was monitored by measuring optical densities of E. coli at 600 nm as a function of time in the presence of carboxylated nanodiamond (cND) particles (100μg/ml) in highly nutritious liquid Luria–Bertani medium. The SEM images prove that cND particles are attached to the bacterial cell wall surface and some portion of the bacterial cell wall undergoes destruction. Due to the change of the protein structure on the bacterial wall, a small Raman shift in the region of 1400 to 1700cm1 was observed when E. coli interacted with cNDs. Raman mapping images show strong evidence of cND attachment at the bacterial cell wall surface. Electrotransformation of E. coli with a fluorescent protein markers experiment demonstrated that the interaction mechanisms are different for E. coli treated with cND particles, E. coli by lysozyme treatment, and E. coli that suffer lysis.

Figures in this Article
© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Anindita Chatterjee ; Elena Perevedentseva ; Mona Jani ; Chih-Yuan Cheng ; Ying-Siou Ye, et al.
"Antibacterial effect of ultrafine nanodiamond against gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli", J. Biomed. Opt. 20(5), 051014 (Dec 15, 2014). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.20.5.051014


Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

PubMed Articles
Photocatalytic-based inactivation of E. coli by UV 282 nm XeBr Excilamp. J Environ Sci Health A Tox Hazard Subst Environ Eng 2013;48(13):1670-6.
Advertisement
  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.