JBO Letters

In-fiber photo-immobilization of a bioactive surface

[+] Author Affiliations
Elizabeth Lee, Derrick Yong

Precision Measurements Group, Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 71 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 638075, Singapore

Nanyang Technological University, Division of Bioengineering, School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, 70 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637457, Singapore

Xia Yu, Hao Li

Precision Measurements Group, Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 71 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 638075, Singapore

Chi Chiu Chan

Nanyang Technological University, Division of Bioengineering, School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, 70 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637457, Singapore

J. Biomed. Opt. 19(12), 120502 (Dec 18, 2014). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.19.12.120502
History: Received September 24, 2014; Accepted November 12, 2014
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Abstract.  We demonstrate the first in-fiber light-induced bioactive biotin-functionalization via photobleaching fluorophore-conjugated biotin. Photobleaching the fluorophores generated free radicals that bind to the albumin-passivated inner surface of pure silica photonic crystal fiber. The subsequent attachment of dye-conjugated streptavidin to the bound biotin qualified the photo-immobilization process and demonstrated a potential for the construction of in-fiber macromolecular assemblies or multiplexes. Compared with other in-fiber bioactive coating methods, the proposed light-induced technique requires only a low-power light source, without the need for additional preactivation steps or toxic chemical reagents. This method, hence, enables a simple and compact implementation for potential biomedical applications.

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© 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Elizabeth Lee ; Derrick Yong ; Xia Yu ; Hao Li and Chi Chiu Chan
"In-fiber photo-immobilization of a bioactive surface", J. Biomed. Opt. 19(12), 120502 (Dec 18, 2014). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.19.12.120502


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