Research Papers: Imaging

Combined lineage mapping and gene expression profiling of embryonic brain patterning using ultrashort pulse microscopy and image registration

[+] Author Affiliations
Holly C. Gibbs

Texas A&M University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, College Station, Texas 77843-3120, United States

Colin R. Dodson

Texas A&M University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, College Station, Texas 77843-3120, United States

Yuqiang Bai

Texas A&M University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, College Station, Texas 77843-3120, United States

Arne C. Lekven

Texas A&M University, Department of Biology, College Station, Texas 77843-3258, United States

Alvin T. Yeh

Texas A&M University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, College Station, Texas 77843-3120, United States

J. Biomed. Opt. 19(12), 126016 (Dec 24, 2014). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.19.12.126016
History: Received September 2, 2014; Accepted November 14, 2014
Text Size: A A A

Abstract.  During embryogenesis, presumptive brain compartments are patterned by dynamic networks of gene expression. The spatiotemporal dynamics of these networks, however, have not been characterized with sufficient resolution for us to understand the regulatory logic resulting in morphogenetic cellular behaviors that give the brain its shape. We have developed a new, integrated approach using ultrashort pulse microscopy [a high-resolution, two-photon fluorescence (2PF)-optical coherence microscopy (OCM) platform using 10-fs pulses] and image registration to study brain patterning and morphogenesis in zebrafish embryos. As a demonstration, we used time-lapse 2PF to capture midbrain-hindbrain boundary morphogenesis and a wnt1 lineage map from embryos during brain segmentation. We then performed in situ hybridization to deposit NBT/BCIP, where wnt1 remained actively expressed, and reimaged the embryos with combined 2PF-OCM. When we merged these datasets using morphological landmark registration, we found that the mechanism of boundary formation differs along the dorsoventral axis. Dorsally, boundary sharpening is dominated by changes in gene expression, while ventrally, sharpening may be accomplished by lineage sorting. We conclude that the integrated visualization of lineage reporter and gene expression domains simultaneously with brain morphology will be useful for understanding how changes in gene expression give rise to proper brain compartmentalization and structure.

Figures in this Article
© 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Holly C. Gibbs ; Colin R. Dodson ; Yuqiang Bai ; Arne C. Lekven and Alvin T. Yeh
"Combined lineage mapping and gene expression profiling of embryonic brain patterning using ultrashort pulse microscopy and image registration", J. Biomed. Opt. 19(12), 126016 (Dec 24, 2014). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.19.12.126016


Tables

Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

PubMed Articles
Advertisement
  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.