Research Papers: Sensing

Fluorescent probes concentration estimation in vitro and ex vivo as a model for early detection of Alzheimer’s disease

[+] Author Affiliations
Osnat Harbater

Tel-Aviv University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Ramat Aviv, Tel-Aviv 69978, Israel

Israel Gannot

Tel-Aviv University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Ramat Aviv, Tel-Aviv 69978, Israel

Johns Hopkins University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School Engineering, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, United States

J. Biomed. Opt. 19(12), 127007 (Dec 29, 2014). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.19.12.127007
History: Received July 24, 2014; Accepted December 1, 2014
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Abstract.  The pathogenic process of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) begins years before clinical diagnosis. Here, we suggest a method that may detect AD several years earlier than current exams. The method is based on previous reports that relate the concentration ratio of biomarkers (amyloid-beta and tau) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to the development of AD. Our method replaces the lumbar puncture process required for CSF drawing by using fluorescence measurements. The system uses an optical fiber coupled to a laser source and a detector. The laser radiation excites two fluorescent probes which may bond to the CSF biomarkers. Their concentration ratio is extracted from the fluorescence intensities and can be used for future AD detection. First, we present a theoretical model for fluorescence concentration ratio estimation. The method’s feasibility was validated using Monte Carlo simulations. Its accuracy was then tested using multilayered tissue phantoms simulating the epidural fat, CSF, and bone. These phantoms have various optical properties, thicknesses, and fluorescence concentrations in order to simulate human anatomy variations and different fiber locations. The method was further tested using ex vivo chicken tissue. The average errors of the estimated concentration ratios were low both in vitro (4.4%) and ex vivo (10.9%), demonstrating high accuracy.

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© 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Osnat Harbater and Israel Gannot
"Fluorescent probes concentration estimation in vitro and ex vivo as a model for early detection of Alzheimer’s disease", J. Biomed. Opt. 19(12), 127007 (Dec 29, 2014). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.19.12.127007


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