Research Papers: General

Optical properties of rabbit brain in the red and near-infrared: changes observed under in vivo, postmortem, frozen, and formalin-fixated conditions

[+] Author Affiliations
Andreas Pitzschke, Olivier Seydoux, Matthieu Zellweger, Georges Wagnières

Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Station 6, Lausanne CH-1015, Switzerland

Blaise Lovisa

Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Station 6, Lausanne CH-1015, Switzerland

Medos International Sàrl, a J&J Company, Chemin Blanc 38, Le Locle CH-2400, Switzerland

Matthias Haenggi

University of Bern, Department of Neurosurgery, Bern University Hospital, Inselspital, Bern CH-3010, Switzerland

Markus F. Oertel

University of Bern, Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Bern University Hospital, Inselspital, Bern CH-3010, Switzerland

Yanik Tardy

Medos International Sàrl, a J&J Company, Chemin Blanc 38, Le Locle CH-2400, Switzerland

J. Biomed. Opt. 20(2), 025006 (Feb 23, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.20.2.025006
History: Received October 24, 2014; Accepted January 29, 2015
Text Size: A A A

Abstract.  The outcome of light-based therapeutic approaches depends on light propagation in biological tissues, which is governed by their optical properties. The objective of this study was to quantify optical properties of brain tissue in vivo and postmortem and assess changes due to tissue handling postmortem. The study was carried out on eight female New Zealand white rabbits. The local fluence rate was measured in the VIS/NIR range in the brain in vivo, just postmortem, and after six weeks’ storage of the head at 20°C or in 10% formaldehyde solution. Only minimal changes in the effective attenuation coefficient μeff were observed for two methods of sacrifice, exsanguination or injection of KCl. Under all tissue conditions, μeff decreased with increasing wavelengths. After long-term storage for six weeks at 20°C, μeff decreased, on average, by 15 to 25% at all wavelengths, while it increased by 5 to 15% at all wavelengths after storage in formaldehyde. We demonstrated that μeff was not very sensitive to the method of animal sacrifice, that tissue freezing significantly altered tissue optical properties, and that formalin fixation might affect the tissue’s optical properties.

Figures in this Article
© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Andreas Pitzschke ; Blaise Lovisa ; Olivier Seydoux ; Matthias Haenggi ; Markus F. Oertel, et al.
"Optical properties of rabbit brain in the red and near-infrared: changes observed under in vivo, postmortem, frozen, and formalin-fixated conditions", J. Biomed. Opt. 20(2), 025006 (Feb 23, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.20.2.025006


Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

PubMed Articles
Advertisement
  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.