Research Papers: Imaging

Macroscopic-imaging technique for subsurface quantification of near-infrared markers during surgery

[+] Author Affiliations
Michael Jermyn

McGill University, Brain Tumour Research Centre, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, 3801 University Street, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2B4, Canada

Polytechnique Montreal, Department of Engineering Physics, CP 6079, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3A7, Canada

Kolbein Kolste, Keith D. Paulsen

Dartmouth College, Thayer School of Engineering, 14 Engineering Drive, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755, United States

Julien Pichette, Guillaume Sheehy, Leticia Angulo-Rodríguez, Frederic Leblond

Polytechnique Montreal, Department of Engineering Physics, CP 6079, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3A7, Canada

David W. Roberts

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Section of Neurosurgery, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03756, United States

Brian C. Wilson

University of Toronto/University Health Network, Department of Medical Biophysics, 101 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7, Canada

Kevin Petrecca

McGill University, Brain Tumour Research Centre, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, 3801 University Street, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2B4, Canada

J. Biomed. Opt. 20(3), 036014 (Mar 20, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.20.3.036014
History: Received January 14, 2015; Accepted March 3, 2015
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Abstract.  Obtaining accurate quantitative information on the concentration and distribution of fluorescent markers lying at a depth below the surface of optically turbid media, such as tissue, is a significant challenge. Here, we introduce a fluorescence reconstruction technique based on a diffusion light transport model that can be used during surgery, including guiding resection of brain tumors, for depth-resolved quantitative imaging of near-infrared fluorescent markers. Hyperspectral fluorescence images are used to compute a topographic map of the fluorophore distribution, which yields structural and optical constraints for a three-dimensional subsequent hyperspectral diffuse fluorescence reconstruction algorithm. Using the model fluorophore Alexa Fluor 647 and brain-like tissue phantoms, the technique yielded estimates of fluorophore concentration within ±25% of the true value to depths of 5 to 9 mm, depending on the concentration. The approach is practical for integration into a neurosurgical fluorescence microscope and has potential to further extend fluorescence-guided resection using objective and quantified metrics of the presence of residual tumor tissue.

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© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Michael Jermyn ; Kolbein Kolste ; Julien Pichette ; Guillaume Sheehy ; Leticia Angulo-Rodríguez, et al.
"Macroscopic-imaging technique for subsurface quantification of near-infrared markers during surgery", J. Biomed. Opt. 20(3), 036014 (Mar 20, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.20.3.036014


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