Special Section on Quantitative Phase Imaging in Biomedicine

Simultaneous full-field 3-D vibrometry of the human eardrum using spatial-bandwidth multiplexed holography

[+] Author Affiliations
Morteza Khaleghi

Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Center for Holographic Studies and Laser micro-mechaTronics (CHSLT), Mechanical Engineering Department, Worcester, Massachusetts 01609, United States

Jérémie Guignard, John J. Rosowski

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Eaton-Peabody Laboratory, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, United States

Harvard Medical School, Department of Otology and Laryngology, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, United States

Cosme Furlong

Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Center for Holographic Studies and Laser micro-mechaTronics (CHSLT), Mechanical Engineering Department, Worcester, Massachusetts 01609, United States

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Eaton-Peabody Laboratory, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, United States

Harvard Medical School, Department of Otology and Laryngology, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, United States

J. Biomed. Opt. 20(11), 111202 (May 18, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.20.11.111202
History: Received January 7, 2015; Accepted March 19, 2015
Text Size: A A A

Abstract.  Holographic interferometric methods typically require the use of three sensitivity vectors in order to obtain three-dimensional (3-D) information. Methods based on multiple directions of illumination have limited applications when studying biological tissues that have temporally varying responses such as the tympanic membrane (TM). Therefore, to measure 3-D displacements in such applications, the measurements along all the sensitivity vectors have to be done simultaneously. We propose a multiple-illumination directions approach to measure 3-D displacements from a single-shot hologram that contains displacement information from three sensitivity vectors. The hologram of an object of interest is simultaneously recorded with three incoherently superimposed pairs of reference and object beams. The incident off-axis angles of the reference beams are adjusted such that the frequency components of the multiplexed hologram are completely separate. Because of the differences in the directions and wavelengths of the reference beams, the positions of each reconstructed image corresponding to each sensitivity vector are different. We implemented a registration algorithm to accurately translate individual components of the hologram into a single global coordinate system to calculate 3-D displacements. The results include magnitudes and phases of 3-D sound-induced motions of a human cadaveric TM at several excitation frequencies showing modal and traveling wave motions on its surface.

Figures in this Article
© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Morteza Khaleghi ; Jérémie Guignard ; Cosme Furlong and John J. Rosowski
"Simultaneous full-field 3-D vibrometry of the human eardrum using spatial-bandwidth multiplexed holography", J. Biomed. Opt. 20(11), 111202 (May 18, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.20.11.111202


Tables

Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

PubMed Articles
Advertisement


 

  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.