JBO Letters

Discrimination of healthy and osteoarthritic articular cartilages by Fourier transform infrared imaging and partial least squares-discriminant analysis

[+] Author Affiliations
Xue-Xi Zhang, Jian-Hua Yin, Zhi-Hua Mao

Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Nanjing, 210016 Jiangsu, China

Yang Xia

Oakland University, Department of Physics and Center for Biomedical Research, Rochester, Michigan 48309, United States

J. Biomed. Opt. 20(6), 060501 (Jun 09, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.20.6.060501
History: Received March 5, 2015; Accepted May 11, 2015
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Abstract.  Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI) combined with chemometrics algorithm has strong potential to obtain complex chemical information from biology tissues. FTIRI and partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were used to differentiate healthy and osteoarthritic (OA) cartilages for the first time. A PLS model was built on the calibration matrix of spectra that was randomly selected from the FTIRI spectral datasets of healthy and lesioned cartilage. Leave-one-out cross-validation was performed in the PLS model, and the fitting coefficient between actual and predicted categorical values of the calibration matrix reached 0.95. In the calibration and prediction matrices, the successful identifying percentages of healthy and lesioned cartilage spectra were 100% and 90.24%, respectively. These results demonstrated that FTIRI combined with PLS-DA could provide a promising approach for the categorical identification of healthy and OA cartilage specimens.

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© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Xue-Xi Zhang ; Jian-Hua Yin ; Zhi-Hua Mao and Yang Xia
"Discrimination of healthy and osteoarthritic articular cartilages by Fourier transform infrared imaging and partial least squares-discriminant analysis", J. Biomed. Opt. 20(6), 060501 (Jun 09, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.20.6.060501


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