Research Papers: General

Raman spectroscopy of human skin: looking for a quantitative algorithm to reliably estimate human age

[+] Author Affiliations
Giuseppe Pezzotti

Kyoto Institute of Technology, Ceramic Physics Laboratory, Sakyo-ku, Matsugasaki, Kyoto 606-8126, Japan

Loma Linda University, Department of Orthopedic Research, Department of Orthopaedics, 11406 Loma Linda Drive, Suite 606 Loma Linda, California 92354, United States

Osaka University, Center for Advanced Medical Engineering and Informatics, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan

Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Molecular Cell Physiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kamigyo-ku, 465 Kajii-cho, Kawaramachi dori, Kyoto 602-0841, Japan

Marco Boffelli

Kyoto Institute of Technology, Ceramic Physics Laboratory, Sakyo-ku, Matsugasaki, Kyoto 606-8126, Japan

Daisuke Miyamori, Takeshi Uemura, Hiroshi Ikegaya

Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Forensic Medicine, Kamigyo-ku, 465 Kajii-cho, Kawaramachi dori, Kyoto 602-0841, Japan

Yoshinori Marunaka

Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Molecular Cell Physiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kamigyo-ku, 465 Kajii-cho, Kawaramachi dori, Kyoto 602-0841, Japan

Wenliang Zhu

Osaka University, Department of Medical Engineering for Treatment of Bone and Joint Disorders, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0854, Japan

J. Biomed. Opt. 20(6), 065008 (Jun 25, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.20.6.065008
History: Received March 9, 2015; Accepted May 18, 2015
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Abstract.  The possibility of examining soft tissues by Raman spectroscopy is challenged in an attempt to probe human age for the changes in biochemical composition of skin that accompany aging. We present a proof-of-concept report for explicating the biophysical links between vibrational characteristics and the specific compositional and chemical changes associated with aging. The actual existence of such links is then phenomenologically proved. In an attempt to foster the basics for a quantitative use of Raman spectroscopy in assessing aging from human skin samples, a precise spectral deconvolution is performed as a function of donors’ ages on five cadaveric samples, which emphasizes the physical significance and the morphological modifications of the Raman bands. The outputs suggest the presence of spectral markers for age identification from skin samples. Some of them appeared as authentic “biological clocks” for the apparent exactness with which they are related to age. Our spectroscopic approach yields clear compositional information of protein folding and crystallization of lipid structures, which can lead to a precise identification of age from infants to adults. Once statistically validated, these parameters might be used to link vibrational aspects at the molecular scale for practical forensic purposes.

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© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Giuseppe Pezzotti ; Marco Boffelli ; Daisuke Miyamori ; Takeshi Uemura ; Yoshinori Marunaka, et al.
"Raman spectroscopy of human skin: looking for a quantitative algorithm to reliably estimate human age", J. Biomed. Opt. 20(6), 065008 (Jun 25, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.20.6.065008


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