Research Papers: Imaging

Intraoperative near-infrared fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy identifies residual tumor cells in wounds

[+] Author Affiliations
David Holt

University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Clinical Studies, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, United States

Ashwin B. Parthasarathy, Arjun G. Yodh

University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, United States

Olugbenga Okusanya, Jane Keating, Ollin Venegas, Brian Madajewski, Sunil Singhal

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, United States

Charuhas Deshpande, Giorgos Karakousis

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, United States

Amy Durham

University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Pathobiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, United States

Shuming Nie

Emory University, Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Chemistry, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, United States

J. Biomed. Opt. 20(7), 076002 (Jul 09, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.20.7.076002
History: Received March 10, 2015; Accepted June 8, 2015
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Abstract.  Surgery is the most effective method to cure patients with solid tumors, and 50% of all cancer patients undergo resection. Local recurrences are due to tumor cells remaining in the wound, thus we explore near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging to identify residual cancer cells after surgery. Fifteen canines and two human patients with spontaneously occurring sarcomas underwent intraoperative imaging. During the operation, the wounds were interrogated with NIR fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy. NIR monitoring identified the presence or absence of residual tumor cells after surgery in 14/15 canines with a mean fluorescence signal-to-background ratio (SBR) of 16. Ten animals showed no residual tumor cells in the wound bed (mean SBR<2, P<0.001). None had a local recurrence at >1-year follow-up. In five animals, the mean SBR of the wound was >15, and histopathology confirmed tumor cells in the postsurgical wound in four/five canines. In the human pilot study, neither patient had residual tumor cells in the wound bed, and both remain disease free at >1.5-year follow up. Intraoperative NIR fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy identifies residual tumor cells in surgical wounds. These observations suggest that NIR imaging techniques may improve tumor resection during cancer operations.

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© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

David Holt ; Ashwin B. Parthasarathy ; Olugbenga Okusanya ; Jane Keating ; Ollin Venegas, et al.
"Intraoperative near-infrared fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy identifies residual tumor cells in wounds", J. Biomed. Opt. 20(7), 076002 (Jul 09, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.20.7.076002


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