Research Papers: Imaging

Time-resolved microscopy reveals the driving mechanism of particle formation during ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dentin-like ivory

[+] Author Affiliations
Matthias Domke

Vorarlberg University of Applied Sciences, Josef Ressel Center for Material Processing with Ultrashort Pulsed Lasers, Research Center for Microtechnology, Hochschulstrasse 1, Dornbirn 6850, Austria

Anna Gavrilova, Heinz P. Huber

Laser Center of Munich University of Applied Sciences, Lothstrasse 34, Munich 80335, Germany

Stephan Rapp

Laser Center of Munich University of Applied Sciences, Lothstrasse 34, Munich 80335, Germany

Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies, Paul-Gordan-Street 6, Erlangen 91052, Germany

Matthias Frentzen

Bonn University Dental Faculty, Department of Periodontology, Conservative and Preventive Dentistry, Welschnonnenstrasse 17, Bonn 53111, Germany

Joerg Meister

Bonn University Dental Faculty, Department of Periodontology, Conservative and Preventive Dentistry, Welschnonnenstrasse 17, Bonn 53111, Germany

RWTH Aachen University, Department of Conservative Dentistry, Periodontology and Preventive Dentistry, Medical Faculty, Pauwelsstrasse 30, Aachen 52074, Germany

J. Biomed. Opt. 20(7), 076005 (Jul 14, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.20.7.076005
History: Received March 20, 2015; Accepted June 15, 2015
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Abstract.  In dental health care, the application of ultrashort laser pulses enables dental tissue ablation free from thermal side effects, such as melting and cracking. However, these laser types create undesired micro- and nanoparticles, which might cause a health risk for the patient or surgeon. The aim of this study was to investigate the driving mechanisms of micro- and nanoparticle formation during ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dental tissue. Time-resolved microscopy was chosen to observe the ablation dynamics of mammoth ivory after irradiation with 660 fs laser pulses. The results suggest that nanoparticles might arise in the excited region. The thermal expansion of the excited material induces high pressure in the surrounding bulk tissue, generating a pressure wave. The rarefaction wave behind this pressure wave causes spallation, leading to ejection of microparticles.

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© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Matthias Domke ; Anna Gavrilova ; Stephan Rapp ; Matthias Frentzen ; Joerg Meister, et al.
"Time-resolved microscopy reveals the driving mechanism of particle formation during ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dentin-like ivory", J. Biomed. Opt. 20(7), 076005 (Jul 14, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.20.7.076005


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