Special Section on Optical Medical Imaging Standards

Hyperspectral wide gap second derivative analysis for in vivo detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

[+] Author Affiliations
Wenli Zheng, Chaojian Wang, Shiwu Zhang

University of Science and Technology of China, Department of Precision Machinery and Precision Instrumentation, No. 433, Huangshan Road, Hefei, Anhui 230027, China

Shufang Chang

Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, N0. 76, Linjiang Road, Chongqing 400010, China

Ronald X. Xu

University of Science and Technology of China, Department of Precision Machinery and Precision Instrumentation, No. 433, Huangshan Road, Hefei, Anhui 230027, China

The Ohio State University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Columbus, Ohio 43210, United States

J. Biomed. Opt. 20(12), 121303 (Jul 28, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.20.12.121303
History: Received February 23, 2015; Accepted June 2, 2015
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Abstract.  Hyperspectral reflectance imaging technique has been used for in vivo detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. However, the clinical outcome of this technique is suboptimal owing to multiple limitations such as nonuniform illumination, high-cost and bulky setup, and time-consuming data acquisition and processing. To overcome these limitations, we acquired the hyperspectral data cube in a wavelength ranging from 600 to 800 nm and processed it by a wide gap second derivative analysis method. This method effectively reduced the image artifacts caused by nonuniform illumination and background absorption. Furthermore, with second derivative analysis, only three specific wavelengths (620, 696, and 772 nm) are needed for tissue classification with optimal separability. Clinical feasibility of the proposed image analysis and classification method was tested in a clinical trial where cervical hyperspectral images from three patients were used for classification analysis. Our proposed method successfully classified the cervix tissue into three categories of normal, inflammation and high-grade lesion. These classification results were coincident with those by an experienced gynecology oncologist after applying acetic acid. Our preliminary clinical study has demonstrated the technical feasibility for in vivo and noninvasive detection of cervical neoplasia without acetic acid. Further clinical research is needed in order to establish a large-scale diagnostic database and optimize the tissue classification technique.

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© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Wenli Zheng ; Chaojian Wang ; Shufang Chang ; Shiwu Zhang and Ronald X. Xu
"Hyperspectral wide gap second derivative analysis for in vivo detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia", J. Biomed. Opt. 20(12), 121303 (Jul 28, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.20.12.121303


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