Research Papers: Imaging

Optical properties of plasmon-resonant bare and silica-coated nanostars used for cell imaging

[+] Author Affiliations
Olga Bibikova, Alexey Popov, Alexander Bykov, Matti Kinnunen

University of Oulu, Faculty of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering, Optoelectronics and Measurement Techniques Laboratory, 3 Erkki Koiso-Kanttilan katu, Oulu 90570, Finland

Artur Prilepskii

Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Science, 13 Prospect Entuziastov, Saratov 410049, Russian Federation

Krisztian Kordas

University of Oulu, Faculty of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering, Microelectronics and Materials Physics Laboratories, 3 Erkki Koiso-Kanttilan katu, Oulu 90570, Finland

Vladimir Bogatyrev, Nikolai Khlebtsov

Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Science, 13 Prospect Entuziastov, Saratov 410049, Russian Federation

Saratov State University, Faculty of Nonlinear Processes, Corporate Department of Biophysics, 83 Astrakhanskaya, Saratov 410012, Russian Federation

Seppo Vainio

University of Oulu, Faculty of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Oulu Center for Cell-Matrix Research, Laboratory of Developmental Biology, 5A Aapistie, Oulu 90220, Finland

Valery Tuchin

University of Oulu, Faculty of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering, Optoelectronics and Measurement Techniques Laboratory, 3 Erkki Koiso-Kanttilan katu, Oulu 90570, Finland

Saratov State University, Faculty of Physics, Department of Optics and Biophotonics, 83 Astrakhanskaya, Saratov 410012, Russian Federation

Institute of Precise Mechanics and Control, Russian Academy of Sciences, 24 Rabochaya, Saratov 410028, Russian Federation

J. Biomed. Opt. 20(7), 076017 (Jul 31, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.20.7.076017
History: Received March 18, 2015; Accepted June 26, 2015
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Abstract.  We synthesized and characterized gold nanostars and their silica-coated derivatives with 7- to 50-nm shell thicknesses as contrast agents for optical imaging. The scattering and absorption coefficients of the nanoparticles (NPs) were estimated by means of collimated transmittance and diffuse reflectance/transmittance analyses. The contrasting properties of the nanostructures were studied in optical coherence tomography glass capillary imaging. The silica-coated nanostars with the thickest shell have higher scattering ability in comparison with bare nanostars. Viability assays confirmed weak in vitro toxicity of nanostructures at up to 200-μg/mL concentrations. We showed real-time visualization of nanostars in both agarose and cultured cells by analyzing the backscattering signal using a conventional laser confocal microscope. The signal intensity detected from the silica-coated NPs was almost 1.5 times higher in comparison with bare nanostars. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that conventional laser confocal microscopy was applied in combined scattering and transmitted light modes to detect the backscattered signal of gold nanostars, which is useful for direct monitoring of the uptake, translocation, and accumulation of NPs in living cells.

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© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Olga Bibikova ; Alexey Popov ; Alexander Bykov ; Artur Prilepskii ; Matti Kinnunen, et al.
"Optical properties of plasmon-resonant bare and silica-coated nanostars used for cell imaging", J. Biomed. Opt. 20(7), 076017 (Jul 31, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.20.7.076017


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