Special Section on Quantitative Phase Imaging in Biomedicine

Active intracellular transport in metastatic cells studied by spatial light interference microscopy

[+] Author Affiliations
Silvia Ceballos, Freddy Monroy

National University of Colombia, Department of Physics, Carrera 30 No. 45-03, Bogotá 11001, Colombia

Mikhail Kandel

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, Quantitative Light Imaging Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Urbana, Illinois 61801, United States

Shamira Sridharan, Hassaan Majeed, Gabriel Popescu

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, Quantitative Light Imaging Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Urbana, Illinois 61801, United States

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Bioengineering, 1304 Springfield Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801, United States

J. Biomed. Opt. 20(11), 111209 (Aug 13, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.20.11.111209
History: Received March 30, 2015; Accepted July 6, 2015
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Abstract.  Spatiotemporal patterns of intracellular transport are very difficult to quantify and, consequently, continue to be insufficiently understood. While it is well documented that mass trafficking inside living cells consists of both random and deterministic motions, quantitative data over broad spatiotemporal scales are lacking. We studied the intracellular transport in live cells using spatial light interference microscopy, a high spatiotemporal resolution quantitative phase imaging tool. The results indicate that in the cytoplasm, the intracellular transport is mainly active (directed, deterministic), while inside the nucleus it is both active and passive (diffusive, random). Furthermore, we studied the behavior of the two-dimensional mass density over 30 h in HeLa cells and focused on the active component. We determined the standard deviation of the velocity distribution at the point of cell division for each cell and compared the standard deviation velocity inside the cytoplasm and the nucleus. We found that the velocity distribution in the cytoplasm is consistently broader than in the nucleus, suggesting mechanisms for faster transport in the cytosol versus the nucleus. Future studies will focus on improving phase measurements by applying a fluorescent tag to understand how particular proteins are transported inside the cell.

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© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Silvia Ceballos ; Mikhail Kandel ; Shamira Sridharan ; Hassaan Majeed ; Freddy Monroy, et al.
"Active intracellular transport in metastatic cells studied by spatial light interference microscopy", J. Biomed. Opt. 20(11), 111209 (Aug 13, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.20.11.111209


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