Research Papers: Imaging

Intraoperative laser speckle contrast imaging improves the stability of rodent middle cerebral artery occlusion model

[+] Author Affiliations
Lu Yuan, Yao Li, Hangdao Li, Hongyang Lu, Shanbao Tong

Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Med-X Research Institute, School of Biomedical Engineering, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240, China

J. Biomed. Opt. 20(9), 096012 (Sep 11, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.20.9.096012
History: Received May 27, 2015; Accepted August 17, 2015
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Abstract.  Rodent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model is commonly used in stroke research. Creating a stable infarct volume has always been challenging for technicians due to the variances of animal anatomy and surgical operations. The depth of filament suture advancement strongly influences the infarct volume as well. We investigated the cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in the affected cortex using laser speckle contrast imaging when advancing suture during MCAO surgery. The relative CBF drop area (CBF50, i.e., the percentage area with CBF less than 50% of the baseline) showed an increase from 20.9% to 69.1% when the insertion depth increased from 1.6 to 1.8 cm. Using the real-time CBF50 marker to guide suture insertion during the surgery, our animal experiments showed that intraoperative CBF-guided surgery could significantly improve the stability of MCAO with a more consistent infarct volume and less mortality.

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© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Lu Yuan ; Yao Li ; Hangdao Li ; Hongyang Lu and Shanbao Tong
"Intraoperative laser speckle contrast imaging improves the stability of rodent middle cerebral artery occlusion model", J. Biomed. Opt. 20(9), 096012 (Sep 11, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.20.9.096012


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