Research Papers: General

Differences in forward angular light scattering distributions between M1 and M2 macrophages

[+] Author Affiliations
David L. Halaney, Marc D. Feldman

University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, Texas 78229, United States

South Texas Veterans Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, 7400 Merton Minter, San Antonio, Texas 78229, United States

Aydin Zahedivash, Tianyi Wang, Thomas E. Milner

University of Texas at Austin, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 1 University Station C0800, Austin, Texas 78712, United States

Jennifer E. Phipps, Claude Jourdan Le Saux

University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, Texas 78229, United States

Jordan Dwelle

South Texas Veterans Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, 7400 Merton Minter, San Antonio, Texas 78229, United States

University of Texas at Austin, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 1 University Station C0800, Austin, Texas 78712, United States

Reto Asmis

University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Departments of Clinical Laboratory Sciences and Biochemistry, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, Texas 78229, United States

J. Biomed. Opt. 20(11), 115002 (Nov 05, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.20.11.115002
History: Received March 31, 2015; Accepted October 9, 2015
Text Size: A A A

Abstract.  The ability to distinguish macrophage subtypes noninvasively could have diagnostic potential in cancer, atherosclerosis, and diabetes, where polarized M1 and M2 macrophages play critical and often opposing roles. Current methods to distinguish macrophage subtypes rely on tissue biopsy. Optical imaging techniques based on light scattering are of interest as they can be translated into biopsy-free strategies. Because mitochondria are relatively strong subcellular light scattering centers, and M2 macrophages are known to have enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis compared to M1, we hypothesized that M1 and M2 macrophages may have different angular light scattering profiles. To test this, we developed an in vitro angle-resolved forward light scattering measurement system. We found that M1 and M2 macrophage monolayers scatter relatively unequal amounts of light in the forward direction between 1.6 deg and 3.2 deg with M2 forward scattering significantly more light than M1 at increasing angles. The ratio of forward scattering can be used to identify the polarization state of macrophage populations in culture.

Figures in this Article
© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

David L. Halaney ; Aydin Zahedivash ; Jennifer E. Phipps ; Tianyi Wang ; Jordan Dwelle, et al.
"Differences in forward angular light scattering distributions between M1 and M2 macrophages", J. Biomed. Opt. 20(11), 115002 (Nov 05, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.20.11.115002


Tables

Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

PubMed Articles
Advertisement
  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.