Research Papers: Imaging

Using thermographic cameras to investigate eye temperature and clinical severity in depression

[+] Author Affiliations
Jerome J. Maller, Paul B. Fitzgerald

The Alfred and Monash University Central Clinical School, Monash Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Shefin Sam George, Rekha Puzhavakkathumadom Viswanathan, Paul Junor

LaTrobe University, School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, Department of Electronic Engineering, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

J. Biomed. Opt. 21(2), 026001 (Feb 01, 2016). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.21.2.026001
History: Received July 3, 2015; Accepted December 30, 2015
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Abstract.  Previous studies suggest that altered corneal temperature may be a feature of schizophrenia, but the association between major depressive disorder (MDD) and corneal temperature has yet to be assessed. The aim of this study is to investigate whether eye temperature is different among MDD patients than among healthy individuals. We used a thermographic camera to measure and compare the temperature profile across the corneas of 16 patients with MDD and 16 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects. We found that the average corneal temperature between the two groups did not differ statistically, although clinical severity correlated positively with right corneal temperature. Corneal temperature may be an indicator of clinical severity in psychiatric disorders, including depression.

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© 2016 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Jerome J. Maller ; Shefin Sam George ; Rekha Puzhavakkathumadom Viswanathan ; Paul B. Fitzgerald and Paul Junor
"Using thermographic cameras to investigate eye temperature and clinical severity in depression", J. Biomed. Opt. 21(2), 026001 (Feb 01, 2016). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.21.2.026001


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