Research Papers: Imaging

Full-field velocity imaging of red blood cells in capillaries with spatiotemporal demodulation autocorrelation

[+] Author Affiliations
Mingyi Wang, Nannan Dong, Guojian Yang

Beijing Normal University, Department of Physics and Applied Optics, Beijing Area Major Laboratory, No. 19, XinJieKouWai Street, HaiDian District, Beijing 100875, China

Beijing Normal University, Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Photochemistry, Ministry of Education, No. 19, XinJieKouWai Street, HaiDian District, Beijing 100875, China

Yaguang Zeng

Beijing Normal University, Department of Physics and Applied Optics, Beijing Area Major Laboratory, No. 19, XinJieKouWai Street, HaiDian District, Beijing 100875, China

Beijing Normal University, Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Photochemistry, Ministry of Education, No. 19, XinJieKouWai Street, HaiDian District, Beijing 100875, China

Foshan University, Department of Photoelectric Technology, No. 18, JiangWan 1st. Street, ChanCheng District, FoShan, Guangdong 528000, China

Riwei Liao

South China Normal University, School of Physics and Telecommunication, Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Center, Panyu District, GuanZhou, Guangdong 510000, China

J. Biomed. Opt. 21(3), 036007 (Mar 14, 2016). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.21.3.036007
History: Received October 15, 2015; Accepted February 24, 2016
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Abstract.  We propose a full-field optical method for the label-free and quantitative mapping of the velocities of red blood cells (RBCs) in capillaries. It integrates spatiotemporal demodulation and an autocorrelation algorithm, and measures RBC velocity according to the ratio of RBC length to lag time. Conventionally, RBC length is assumed to be a constant and lag time is taken as a variable, while our method treats both of them as variables. We use temporal demodulation and the Butterworth spatial filter to separate RBC signal from background signal, based on which we obtain the RBC length by image segmentation and lag time by autocorrelation analysis. The RBC velocity calculated now is more accurate. The validity of our method is verified by an in vivo experiment on a mouse ear. Owing to its higher image signal-to-noise ratio, our method can be used for mapping RBC velocity in the turbid tissue case.

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© 2016 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Mingyi Wang ; Yaguang Zeng ; Nannan Dong ; Riwei Liao and Guojian Yang
"Full-field velocity imaging of red blood cells in capillaries with spatiotemporal demodulation autocorrelation", J. Biomed. Opt. 21(3), 036007 (Mar 14, 2016). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.21.3.036007


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