Special Section on Clinical Near-Infrared Spectroscopy and Imaging

Measuring reactive hyperemia in the lower limb using near-infrared spectroscopy

[+] Author Affiliations
Thomas B. Willingham, William M. Southern, Kevin K. McCully

University of Georgia, Department of Kinesiology, 330 River Road, Athens, Georgia 30605, United States

J. Biomed. Opt. 21(9), 091302 (Apr 05, 2016). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.21.9.091302
History: Received November 2, 2015; Accepted January 14, 2016
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Abstract.  Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been used to measure reactive hyperemia following a vascular occlusion. However, the procedures and methods of analysis used have varied. The purpose of the present study is to identify reproducible methods for measuring reactive hyperemia using HbO2 NIRS signals in the calf and foot. Healthy participants (10 male, 10 female) aged 19 to 28 years performed one of two tests: reproducibility trials or elevation protocol (30 and 60 cm limb elevation above the heart). The time to 50% reperfusion (T1/2) and the second (R2q) quartile rates of reperfusion were found to be the most reproducible parameters (coefficient of variation=7.12 to 14.1%). The time to 95% reperfusion (T95) was 12.7% more reproducible on average than the previously reported parameter of time to peak hyperemia. Measures of reperfusion time and rate slowed with increasing limb elevation. Correlations were identified between the calf and foot in the measurements of R2q (R2=0.713, p=0.021), T1/2 (R2=0.673, p=0.033), and T95 (R2=0.792, p=0.006). Half and 95% recovery times and second and third quartile rates expressed good reproducibility and sensitivity to change with reduced perfusion pressure. NIRS measures of reactive hyperemia have the potential to evaluate microvascular perfusion in clinical populations.

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© 2016 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Thomas B. Willingham ; William M. Southern and Kevin K. McCully
"Measuring reactive hyperemia in the lower limb using near-infrared spectroscopy", J. Biomed. Opt. 21(9), 091302 (Apr 05, 2016). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.21.9.091302


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