Special Section on Polarized Light for Biomedical Applications

Ex vivo Mueller polarimetric imaging of the uterine cervix: a first statistical evaluation

[+] Author Affiliations
Jean Rehbinder, Stanislas Deby, Tatiana Novikova, Angelo Pierangelo, François Moreau

Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces, CNRS, Ecole polytechnique, Université Paris-Saclay, Route de Saclay, Palaiseau 91128, France

Huda Haddad

Tafila Technical University, Applied Physics Department, Faculty of Science, P.O. Box 179, Tafila 66110, Jordan

Benjamin Teig

CHU de Bicêtre AP-HP, Service d’anatomie pathologique, 78 rue du Général Leclerc, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre 94270, France

André Nazac

CHU de Bicêtre AP-HP, Service de Gynécologie Obstétrique, 78 rue du Général Leclerc, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre 94270, France

Université Libre de Bruxelles, University Hospital Brugmann, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Place A. Van Gehuchten 4, Brussels 1020, Belgium

J. Biomed. Opt. 21(7), 071113 (Apr 25, 2016). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.21.7.071113
History: Received October 30, 2015; Accepted March 1, 2016
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Abstract.  Early detection through screening plays a major role in reducing the impact of cervical cancer on patients. When detected before the invasive stage, precancerous lesions can be eliminated with very limited surgery. Polarimetric imaging is a potential alternative to the standard screening methods currently used. In a previous proof-of-concept study, significant contrasts have been found in polarimetric images acquired for healthy and precancerous regions of excised cervical tissue. To quantify the ability of the technique to differentiate between healthy and precancerous tissue, polarimetric images of seventeen cervical conization specimens (cone-shaped or cylindrical wedges from the uterine cervix) are compared with results from histopathological diagnoses, which is considered to be the “gold standard.” The sensitivity and specificity of the technique are calculated for images acquired at wavelengths of 450, 550, and 600 nm, aiming to differentiate between high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN 2-3) and healthy squamous epithelium. To do so, a sliding threshold for the scalar retardance parameter was used for the sample zones, as labeled after histological diagnosis. An optimized value of 83% is achieved for both sensitivity and specificity for images acquired at 450 nm and for a threshold scalar retardance value of 10.6 deg. This study paves the way for an application of polarimetry in the clinic.

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© 2016 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Jean Rehbinder ; Huda Haddad ; Stanislas Deby ; Benjamin Teig ; André Nazac, et al.
"Ex vivo Mueller polarimetric imaging of the uterine cervix: a first statistical evaluation", J. Biomed. Opt. 21(7), 071113 (Apr 25, 2016). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.21.7.071113


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