JBO Letters

Cell optoporation with a sub-15 fs and a 250-fs laser

[+] Author Affiliations
Hans Georg Breunig

JenLab GmbH, Science Park 2, Campus D 1.2, 66123 Saarbrücken, Germany and Schillerstr. 1, 07745 Jena, Germany

Ana Batista, Aisada Uchugonova, Karsten König

JenLab GmbH, Science Park 2, Campus D 1.2, 66123 Saarbrücken, Germany and Schillerstr. 1, 07745 Jena, Germany

Saarland University, Department of Biophotonics and Laser Technology, Campus A5.1, 66123 Saarbrücken, Germany

J. Biomed. Opt. 21(6), 060501 (Jun 01, 2016). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.21.6.060501
History: Received March 30, 2016; Accepted May 5, 2016
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Abstract.  We employed two commercially available femtosecond lasers, a Ti:sapphire and a ytterbium-based oscillator, to directly compare from a user’s practical point-of-view in one common experimental setup the efficiencies of transient laser-induced cell membrane permeabilization, i.e., of so-called optoporation. The experimental setup consisted of a modified multiphoton laser-scanning microscope employing high-NA focusing optics. An automatic cell irradiation procedure was realized with custom-made software that identified cell positions and controlled relevant hardware components. The Ti:sapphire and ytterbium-based oscillators generated broadband sub-15-fs pulses around 800 nm and 250-fs pulses at 1044 nm, respectively. A higher optoporation rate and posttreatment viability were observed for the shorter fs pulses, confirming the importance of multiphoton effects for efficient optoporation.

Figures in this Article
© 2016 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Topics

Lasers

Citation

Hans Georg Breunig ; Ana Batista ; Aisada Uchugonova and Karsten König
"Cell optoporation with a sub-15 fs and a 250-fs laser", J. Biomed. Opt. 21(6), 060501 (Jun 01, 2016). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.21.6.060501


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