Research Papers: General

Femtosecond laser ablation of enamel

[+] Author Affiliations
Quang-Tri Le

Lisbon University, Instituto Superior Técnico and CeFEMA Center of Physics and Engineering of Advanced Materials, Avenida Rovisco Pais, 1049–001 Lisboa, Portugal

Laboratoire ICMCB—CNRS-UPR9048, 87, Avenue du Dr Albert Schweitzer, 33608 PESSAC Cedex, France

Caroline Bertrand

Laboratoire ICMCB—CNRS-UPR9048, 87, Avenue du Dr Albert Schweitzer, 33608 PESSAC Cedex, France

Rui Vilar

Lisbon University, Instituto Superior Técnico and CeFEMA Center of Physics and Engineering of Advanced Materials, Avenida Rovisco Pais, 1049–001 Lisboa, Portugal

J. Biomed. Opt. 21(6), 065005 (Jun 22, 2016). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.21.6.065005
History: Received March 1, 2016; Accepted June 1, 2016
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Abstract.  The surface topographical, compositional, and structural modifications induced in human enamel by femtosecond laser ablation is studied. The laser treatments were performed using a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560 fs and 1030 nm) and fluences up to 14  J/cm2. The ablation surfaces were studied by scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Regardless of the fluence, the ablation surfaces were covered by a layer of resolidified material, indicating that ablation is accompanied by melting of hydroxyapatite. This layer presented pores and exploded gas bubbles, created by the release of gaseous decomposition products of hydroxyapatite (CO2 and H2O) within the liquid phase. In the specimen treated with 1-kHz repetition frequency and 14  J/cm2, thickness of the resolidified material is in the range of 300 to 900 nm. The micro-Raman analysis revealed that the resolidified material contains amorphous calcium phosphate, while grazing incidence x-ray diffraction analysis allowed detecting traces of a calcium phosphate other than hydroxyapatite, probably β-tricalcium phosphate Ca3(PO4)2, at the surface of this specimen. The present results show that the ablation of enamel involves melting of enamel’s hydroxyapatite, but the thickness of the altered layer is very small and thermal damage of the remaining material is negligible.

Figures in this Article
© 2016 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Quang-Tri Le ; Caroline Bertrand and Rui Vilar
"Femtosecond laser ablation of enamel", J. Biomed. Opt. 21(6), 065005 (Jun 22, 2016). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.21.6.065005


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