Special Section on Clinical Near-Infrared Spectroscopy and Imaging

Correlation between electrical and hemodynamic responses during visual stimulation with graded contrasts

[+] Author Affiliations
Juanning Si, Xin Zhang, Yujin Zhang, Nianming Zuo

Chinese Academy of Sciences, Brainnetome Center, Institute of Automation, Beijing 100190, China

Chinese Academy of Sciences, National Laboratory of Pattern Recognition, Institute of Automation, Beijing 100190, China

Yuejun Li

University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Key Laboratory for NeuroInformation of the Ministry of Education, School of Life Science and Technology, Chengdu 625014, China

Tianzi Jiang

Chinese Academy of Sciences, Brainnetome Center, Institute of Automation, Beijing 100190, China

Chinese Academy of Sciences, National Laboratory of Pattern Recognition, Institute of Automation, Beijing 100190, China

University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Key Laboratory for NeuroInformation of the Ministry of Education, School of Life Science and Technology, Chengdu 625014, China

Chinese Academy of Sciences, CAS Center for Excellence in Brain Science, Institute of Automation, Beijing 100190, China

University of Queensland, Queensland Brain Institute, St. Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australia

J. Biomed. Opt. 21(9), 091315 (Aug 05, 2016). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.21.9.091315
History: Received December 31, 2015; Accepted July 13, 2016
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Abstract.  Brain functional activity involves complex cellular, metabolic, and vascular chain reactions, making it difficult to comprehend. Electroencephalography (EEG) and functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) have been combined into a multimodal neuroimaging method that captures both electrophysiological and hemodynamic information to explore the spatiotemporal characteristics of brain activity. Because of the significance of visually evoked functional activity in clinical applications, numerous studies have explored the amplitude of the visual evoked potential (VEP) to clarify its relationship with the hemodynamic response. However, relatively few studies have investigated the influence of latency, which has been frequently used to diagnose visual diseases, on the hemodynamic response. Moreover, because the latency and the amplitude of VEPs have different roles in coding visual information, investigating the relationship between latency and the hemodynamic response should be helpful. In this study, checkerboard reversal tasks with graded contrasts were used to evoke visual functional activity. Both EEG and fNIRS were employed to investigate the relationship between neuronal electrophysiological activities and the hemodynamic responses. The VEP amplitudes were linearly correlated with the hemodynamic response, but the VEP latency showed a negative linear correlation with the hemodynamic response.

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© 2016 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Juanning Si ; Xin Zhang ; Yuejun Li ; Yujin Zhang ; Nianming Zuo, et al.
"Correlation between electrical and hemodynamic responses during visual stimulation with graded contrasts", J. Biomed. Opt. 21(9), 091315 (Aug 05, 2016). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.21.9.091315


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