Special Series on Translational Biophotonics

Handheld, point-of-care laser speckle imaging

[+] Author Affiliations
Ryan Farraro

University of California-Irvine, Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, 1002 Health Sciences Road East, Irvine, California 92612, United States

University of California-Irvine, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 3120 Natural Sciences II, Irvine, California 92697, United States

Omid Fathi

University of California-Irvine, Department of Pediatrics, 505 South Main Street, Irvine, Orange, California 92868, United States

Bernard Choi

University of California-Irvine, Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, 1002 Health Sciences Road East, Irvine, California 92612, United States

University of California-Irvine, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 3120 Natural Sciences II, Irvine, California 92697, United States

University of California-Irvine, Department of Surgery, 333 City Boulevard West, Suite 1600, Orange, California 92868, United States

University of California-Irvine, Edwards Lifesciences Center for Advanced Cardiovascular Technology, 2400 Engineering Hall, Irvine, California 92697, United States

CHOC Children’s Hospital, 1201 West La Veta Avenue, Orange, California 92868, United States

J. Biomed. Opt. 21(9), 094001 (Aug 31, 2016). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.21.9.094001
History: Received April 25, 2016; Accepted August 12, 2016
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Abstract.  Laser speckle imaging (LSI) enables measurement of relative changes in blood flow in biological tissues. We postulate that a point-of-care form factor will lower barriers to routine clinical use of LSI. Here, we describe a first-generation handheld LSI device based on a tablet computer. The coefficient of variation of speckle contrast was <2% after averaging imaging data collected over an acquisition period of 5.3 s. With a single, experienced user, handheld motion artifacts had a negligible effect on data collection. With operation by multiple users, we did not identify any significant difference (p>0.05) between the measured speckle contrast values using either a handheld or mounted configuration. In vivo data collected during occlusion experiments demonstrate that a handheld LSI is capable of both quantitative and qualitative assessment of changes in blood flow. Finally, as a practical application of handheld LSI, we collected data from a 53-day-old neonate with confirmed compromised blood flow in the hand. We readily identified with LSI a region of diminished blood flow in the thumb of the affected hand. Our data collectively suggest that handheld LSI is a promising technique to enable clinicians to obtain point-of-care measurements of blood flow.

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© 2016 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Ryan Farraro ; Omid Fathi and Bernard Choi
"Handheld, point-of-care laser speckle imaging", J. Biomed. Opt. 21(9), 094001 (Aug 31, 2016). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.21.9.094001


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