Research Papers: Sensing

Real-time three-dimensional digital image correlation for biomedical applications

[+] Author Affiliations
Rong Wu

Shanghai Institute of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics, 149 Yanchang Road, Shanghai 200072, China

Shanghai Key Laboratory of Mechanics in Energy Engineering, 149 Yanchang Road, Shanghai 200072, China

Hua Wu

The Second People’s Hospital of Foshan, Department of Orthopaedics, 78 Weiguo Road, Foshan 528000, China

Dwayne Arola

University of Washington, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Box 352120, Seattle, Washington 98195, United States

Dongsheng Zhang

Shanghai Key Laboratory of Mechanics in Energy Engineering, 149 Yanchang Road, Shanghai 200072, China

Shanghai University, Department of Mechanics, 99 Shangda Road, Shanghai 200444, China

J. Biomed. Opt. 21(10), 107003 (Oct 21, 2016). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.21.10.107003
History: Received July 21, 2016; Accepted September 30, 2016
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Abstract.  Digital image correlation (DIC) has been successfully applied for evaluating the mechanical behavior of biological tissues. A three-dimensional (3-D) DIC system has been developed and applied to examining the motion of bones in the human foot. To achieve accurate, real-time displacement measurements, an algorithm including matching between sequential images and image pairs has been developed. The system was used to monitor the movement of markers which were attached to a precisely motorized stage. The accuracy of the proposed technique for in-plane and out-of-plane measurements was found to be 0.25% and 1.17%, respectively. Two biomedical applications were presented. In the experiment involving the foot arch, a human cadaver lower leg and foot specimen were subjected to vertical compressive loads up to 700 N at a rate of 10  N/s and the 3-D motions of bones in the foot were monitored in real time. In the experiment involving distal tibio fibular syndesmosis, a human cadaver lower leg and foot specimen were subjected to a monotonic rotational torque up to 5 Nm at a speed of 5 deg per min and the relative displacements of the tibia and fibula were monitored in real time. Results showed that the system could reach a frequency of up to 16 Hz with 6 points measured simultaneously. This technique sheds new lights on measuring 3-D motion of bones in biomechanical studies.

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© 2016 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Rong Wu ; Hua Wu ; Dwayne Arola and Dongsheng Zhang
"Real-time three-dimensional digital image correlation for biomedical applications", J. Biomed. Opt. 21(10), 107003 (Oct 21, 2016). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.21.10.107003


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