Research Papers: Sensing

Ferric plasmonic nanoparticles, aptamers, and magnetofluidic chips: toward the development of diagnostic surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy assays

[+] Author Affiliations
Haley Marks

Texas A&M University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 101 Bizzell Street, College Station, Texas 77843, United States

University of Strathclyde, Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, 99 George Street, Glasgow G1 1RD, United Kingdom

Po-Jung Huang

Texas A&M University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 575 Ross Street, College Station, Texas 77843, United States

Samuel Mabbott, Duncan Graham

University of Strathclyde, Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, 99 George Street, Glasgow G1 1RD, United Kingdom

Jun Kameoka

Texas A&M University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 188 Bizzell Street, College Station, Texas 77843, United States

Gerard Coté

Texas A&M University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 101 Bizzell Street, College Station, Texas 77843, United States

Texas A&M University, Texas A&M Engineering Experiment Station Center for Remote Health Technologies and Systems, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 101 Bizzell Street, College Station, Texas 77843, United States

J. Biomed. Opt. 21(12), 127005 (Dec 20, 2016). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.21.12.127005
History: Received August 20, 2016; Accepted November 17, 2016
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Abstract.  Conjugation of aptamers and their corresponding analytes onto plasmonic nanoparticles mediates the formation of nanoparticle assemblies: molecularly bound nanoclusters that cause a measurable change in the colloid’s optical properties. The optimization of a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) competitive binding assay utilizing plasmonic “target” and magnetic “probe” nanoparticles for the detection of the toxin bisphenol-A (BPA) is presented. These assay nanoclusters were housed inside three types of optofluidic chips patterned with magnetically activated nickel pads, in either a straight or array pattern. Both Fe2O3 and Fe2CoO4 were compared as potential magnetic cores for the silver-coated probe nanoparticles. We found that the Ag@Fe2O3 particles were, on average, more uniform in size and more stable than Ag@Fe2CoO4, whereas the addition of cobalt significantly improved the collection time of particles. Using Raman mapping of the assay housed within the magnetofluidic chips, it was determined that a 1×5 array of 50  μm square nickel pads provided the most uniform SERS enhancement of the assay (coefficient of variation 25%) within the magnetofluidic chip. Additionally, the packaged assay demonstrated the desired response to BPA, verifying the technology’s potential to translate magnetic nanoparticle assays into a user-free optical analysis platform.

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© 2016 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Haley Marks ; Po-Jung Huang ; Samuel Mabbott ; Duncan Graham ; Jun Kameoka, et al.
"Ferric plasmonic nanoparticles, aptamers, and magnetofluidic chips: toward the development of diagnostic surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy assays", J. Biomed. Opt. 21(12), 127005 (Dec 20, 2016). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.21.12.127005


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