Research Papers: Imaging

Hyperspectral fluorescence microscopy detects autofluorescent factors that can be exploited as a diagnostic method for Candida species differentiation

[+] Author Affiliations
Matthew S. Graus, Aaron K. Neumann

University of New Mexico, Department of Pathology, 1 University of New Mexico, MSC08 4640, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131, United States

Jerilyn A. Timlin

Sandia National Laboratories, Department of Bioenergy and Defense Technologies, P. O. Box 5800, MS 0895, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185, United States

J. Biomed. Opt. 22(1), 016002 (Jan 05, 2017). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.22.1.016002
History: Received May 23, 2016; Accepted December 12, 2016
Text Size: A A A

Abstract.  Fungi in the Candida genus are the most common fungal pathogens. They not only cause high morbidity and mortality but can also cost billions of dollars in healthcare. To alleviate this burden, early and accurate identification of Candida species is necessary. However, standard identification procedures can take days and have a large false negative error. The method described in this study takes advantage of hyperspectral confocal fluorescence microscopy, which enables the capability to quickly and accurately identify and characterize the unique autofluorescence spectra from different Candida species with up to 84% accuracy when grown in conditions that closely mimic physiological conditions.

Figures in this Article
© 2017 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Matthew S. Graus ; Aaron K. Neumann and Jerilyn A. Timlin
"Hyperspectral fluorescence microscopy detects autofluorescent factors that can be exploited as a diagnostic method for Candida species differentiation", J. Biomed. Opt. 22(1), 016002 (Jan 05, 2017). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.22.1.016002


Tables

Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

PubMed Articles
Advertisement
  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.