Special Section on Advanced Laser Technologies for Biophotonics

Low-frequency vibrational spectroscopy of proteins with different secondary structures

[+] Author Affiliations
Irina A. Balakhnina, Nikolay N. Brandt, Anna A. Mankova, Irina G. Shpachenko

Lomonosov Moscow State University, Physics Department, Leninskie gory, Moscow, Russia

Andrey Yu. Chikishev

Lomonosov Moscow State University, International Laser Center, Leninskie gory, Moscow, Russia

J. Biomed. Opt. 22(9), 091509 (Mar 25, 2017). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.22.9.091509
History: Received January 5, 2017; Accepted March 14, 2017
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Abstract.  Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectra of proteins with significantly different structures are measured in a spectral interval of 50 to 500  cm1 and noticeable spectral differences are revealed. Intensities of several spectral bands correlate with contents of secondary structure elements. FTIR spectra of superhelical proteins exhibit developed spectral features that are absent in the spectra of globular proteins. Significant differences of the Raman spectra of proteins that are not directly related to the difference of the secondary structures can be due to differences of tertiary and/or quaternary structure of protein molecules.

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© 2017 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Irina A. Balakhnina ; Nikolay N. Brandt ; Andrey Yu. Chikishev ; Anna A. Mankova and Irina G. Shpachenko
"Low-frequency vibrational spectroscopy of proteins with different secondary structures", J. Biomed. Opt. 22(9), 091509 (Mar 25, 2017). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.22.9.091509


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