Research Papers: General

Listening to membrane potential: photoacoustic voltage-sensitive dye recording

[+] Author Affiliations
Haichong K. Zhang, Jeeun Kang

Johns Hopkins University, Department of Computer Science, Baltimore, Maryland, United States

Ping Yan, Leslie M. Loew

University of Connecticut School of Medicine, R. D. Berlin Center for Cell Analysis and Modeling, Farmington, Connecticut, United States

Diane S. Abou, Abhinav K. Jha

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology, Baltimore, Maryland, United States

Hanh N. D. Le, Jin U. Kang

Johns Hopkins University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Baltimore, Maryland, United States

Daniel L. J. Thorek, Arman Rahmim

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology, Baltimore, Maryland, United States

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Department of Oncology, Baltimore, Maryland, United States

Dean F. Wong

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology, Baltimore, Maryland, United States

Johns Hopkins University, Department of Neuroscience, Baltimore, Maryland, United States

Johns Hopkins University, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Baltimore, Maryland, United States

Johns Hopkins University, Department of Neurology, Baltimore, Maryland, United States

Emad M. Boctor

Johns Hopkins University, Department of Computer Science, Baltimore, Maryland, United States

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology, Baltimore, Maryland, United States

Johns Hopkins University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Baltimore, Maryland, United States

J. Biomed. Opt. 22(4), 045006 (Apr 10, 2017). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.22.4.045006
History: Received December 1, 2016; Accepted March 17, 2017
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Abstract.  Voltage-sensitive dyes (VSDs) are designed to monitor membrane potential by detecting fluorescence changes in response to neuronal or muscle electrical activity. However, fluorescence imaging is limited by depth of penetration and high scattering losses, which leads to low sensitivity in vivo systems for external detection. By contrast, photoacoustic (PA) imaging, an emerging modality, is capable of deep tissue, noninvasive imaging by combining near-infrared light excitation and ultrasound detection. Here, we show that voltage-dependent quenching of dye fluorescence leads to a reciprocal enhancement of PA intensity. We synthesized a near-infrared photoacoustic VSD (PA-VSD), whose PA intensity change is sensitive to membrane potential. In the polarized state, this cyanine-based probe enhances PA intensity while decreasing fluorescence output in a lipid vesicle membrane model. A theoretical model accounts for how the experimental PA intensity change depends on fluorescence and absorbance properties of the dye. These results not only demonstrate PA voltage sensing but also emphasize the interplay of both fluorescence and absorbance properties in the design of optimized PA probes. Together, our results demonstrate PA sensing as a potential new modality for recording and external imaging of electrophysiological and neurochemical events in the brain.

Figures in this Article
© 2017 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Haichong K. Zhang ; Ping Yan ; Jeeun Kang ; Diane S. Abou ; Hanh N. D. Le, et al.
"Listening to membrane potential: photoacoustic voltage-sensitive dye recording", J. Biomed. Opt. 22(4), 045006 (Apr 10, 2017). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.22.4.045006


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