Research Papers: Imaging

Computer-aided detection and quantification of endolymphatic hydrops within the mouse cochlea in vivo using optical coherence tomography

[+] Author Affiliations
George S. Liu, Jinkyung Kim, John S. Oghalai

Stanford University, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford, California, United States

Brian E. Applegate

Texas A&M University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, College Station, Texas, United States

J. Biomed. Opt. 22(7), 076002 (Jul 06, 2017). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.22.7.076002
History: Received April 13, 2017; Accepted June 13, 2017
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Abstract.  Diseases that cause hearing loss and/or vertigo in humans such as Meniere’s disease are often studied using animal models. The volume of endolymph within the inner ear varies with these diseases. Here, we used a mouse model of increased endolymph volume, endolymphatic hydrops, to develop a computer-aided objective approach to measure endolymph volume from images collected in vivo using optical coherence tomography. The displacement of Reissner’s membrane from its normal position was measured in cochlear cross sections. We validated our computer-aided measurements with manual measurements and with trained observer labels. This approach allows for computer-aided detection of endolymphatic hydrops in mice, with test performance showing sensitivity of 91% and specificity of 87% using a running average of five measurements. These findings indicate that this approach is accurate and reliable for classifying endolymphatic hydrops and quantifying endolymph volume.

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© 2017 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

George S. Liu ; Jinkyung Kim ; Brian E. Applegate and John S. Oghalai
"Computer-aided detection and quantification of endolymphatic hydrops within the mouse cochlea in vivo using optical coherence tomography", J. Biomed. Opt. 22(7), 076002 (Jul 06, 2017). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.22.7.076002


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