Research Papers: Imaging

Imaging tumor hypoxia by near-infrared fluorescence tomography

[+] Author Affiliations
Nrusingh C. Biswal, Andres Aguirre, Yan Xu, Saeid Zanganeh, Quing Zhu

University of Connecticut, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Storrs, Connecticut 06269

Christopher Pavlik, Michael B. Smith

University of Connecticut, Department of Chemistry, Storrs, Connecticut 06269

Liisa T. Kuhn

University of Connecticut Health Center, Department of Reconstructive Sciences, Farmington, Connecticut 06030

Kevin P. Claffey

University of Connecticut Health Center, Department of Cell Biology, Farmington, Connecticut 06030

J. Biomed. Opt. 16(6), 066009 (June 14, 2011). doi:10.1117/1.3589348
History: Received July 20, 2010; Revised April 08, 2011; Accepted April 19, 2011; Published June 14, 2011; Online June 14, 2011
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We have developed a novel nitroimidazole indocyanine dye conjugate for tumor-targeted hypoxia fluorescence tomography. The hypoxia probe has been evaluated in vitro using tumor cell lines and in vivo with tumor targeting in mice. The in vitro cell studies were performed to assess fluorescence labeling differences between hypoxia and normoxia conditions. When treated with the hypoxia probe, a fluorescence emission ratio of 2.5-fold was found between the cells incubated under hypoxia compared to the cells in normoxia condition. Hypoxia specificity was also confirmed by comparing the cells treated with indocyanine dye alone. In vivo tumor targeting in mice showed that the fluorescence signals measured at the tumor site were twice those at the normal site after 150 min post-injection of the hypoxia probe. On the other hand, the fluorescence signals measured after injection of indocyanine dye were the same at tumor and normal sites. In vivo fluorescence tomography images of mice injected with the hypoxia probe showed that the probe remained for more than 5 to 7 h in the tumors, however, the images of mice injected with indocyanine only dye confirmed that the unbound dye washed out in less than 3 h. These findings are supported with fluorescence images of histological sections of tumor samples using a Li-COR scanner and immunohistochemistry technique for tumor hypoxia.

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© 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)

Citation

Nrusingh C. Biswal ; Christopher Pavlik ; Michael B. Smith ; Andres Aguirre ; Yan Xu, et al.
"Imaging tumor hypoxia by near-infrared fluorescence tomography", J. Biomed. Opt. 16(6), 066009 (June 14, 2011). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3589348


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