Research Papers: Therapeutic

Laser phototherapy triggers the production of reactive oxygen species in oral epithelial cells without inducing DNA damage

[+] Author Affiliations
Caroline Siviero Dillenburg

Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, School of Dentistry, Department of Oral Pathology, Rio Grande do Sul 90035-003, Brazil

Luciana Oliveira Almeida

University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, Laboratory of Epithelial Biology, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1078

Manoela Domingues Martins

Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, School of Dentistry, Department of Oral Pathology, Rio Grande do Sul 90035-003, Brazil

Cristiane Helena Squarize

University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, Laboratory of Epithelial Biology, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1078

Rogerio Moraes Castilho

University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, Laboratory of Epithelial Biology, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1078

J. Biomed. Opt. 19(4), 048002 (Apr 29, 2014). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.19.4.048002
History: Received December 23, 2013; Revised March 12, 2014; Accepted March 31, 2014
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Abstract.  Laser phototherapy (LPT) is widely used in clinical practice to accelerate healing. Although the use of LPT has advantages, the molecular mechanisms involved in the process of accelerated healing and the safety concerns associated with LPT are still poorly understood. We investigated the physiological effects of LPT irradiation on the production and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), genomic instability, and deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) damage in human epithelial cells. In contrast to a high energy density (20J/cm2), laser administered at a low energy density (4J/cm2) resulted in the accumulation of ROS. Interestingly, 4J/cm2 of LPT did not induce DNA damage, genomic instability, or nuclear influx of the BRCA1 DNA damage repair protein, a known genome protective molecule that actively participates in DNA repair. Our results suggest that administration of low energy densities of LPT induces the accumulation of safe levels of ROS, which may explain the accelerated healing results observed in patients. These findings indicate that epithelial cells have an endowed molecular circuitry that responds to LPT by physiologically inducing accumulation of ROS, which triggers accelerated healing. Importantly, our results suggest that low energy densities of LPT can serve as a safe therapy to accelerate epithelial healing.

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© 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Caroline Siviero Dillenburg ; Luciana Oliveira Almeida ; Manoela Domingues Martins ; Cristiane Helena Squarize and Rogerio Moraes Castilho
"Laser phototherapy triggers the production of reactive oxygen species in oral epithelial cells without inducing DNA damage", J. Biomed. Opt. 19(4), 048002 (Apr 29, 2014). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.19.4.048002


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