Research Papers: Imaging

Detection of reduced interhemispheric cortical communication during task execution in multiple sclerosis patients using functional near-infrared spectroscopy

[+] Author Affiliations
Jon J. Jimenez, Runze Yang, Vishal P. Varshney

University of Calgary, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N1 Canada

Nabeela Nathoo

University of Calgary, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N1 Canada

University of Calgary, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, T2N 4N1 Canada

Ali-Mohammad Golestani

Foothills Medical Centre, Seaman Family MR Research Centre, 1403 29th St. NW, Calgary, T2N 2T9 Canada

University of Calgary, Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, T2N 1N4 Canada

Bradley G. Goodyear

University of Calgary, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N1 Canada

University of Calgary, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, T2N 4N1 Canada

Foothills Medical Centre, Seaman Family MR Research Centre, 1403 29th St. NW, Calgary, T2N 2T9 Canada

University of Calgary, Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, T2N 1N4 Canada

Luanne M. Metz

University of Calgary, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, T2N 4N1 Canada

University of Calgary, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N1 Canada

Jeff F. Dunn

University of Calgary, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N1 Canada

University of Calgary, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, T2N 4N1 Canada

University of Calgary, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N1 Canada

University of Calgary, Experimental Imaging Centre, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, T2N 4N1 Canada

J. Biomed. Opt. 19(7), 076008 (Jul 08, 2014). doi:10.1117/1.JBO.19.7.076008
History: Received February 17, 2014; Revised May 21, 2014; Accepted June 2, 2014
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Abstract.  Multiple sclerosis (MS) impairs brain activity through demyelination and loss of axons. Increased brain activity is accompanied by increases in microvascular hemoglobin oxygen saturation (oxygenation) and total hemoglobin, which can be measured using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Due to the potentially reduced size and integrity of the white matter tracts within the corpus callosum, it may be expected that MS patients have reduced functional communication between the left and right sides of the brain; this could potentially be an indicator of disease progression. To assess interhemispheric communication in MS, we used fNIRS during a unilateral motor task and the resting state. The magnitude of the change in hemoglobin parameters in the motor cortex was significantly reduced in MS patients during the motor task relative to healthy control subjects. There was also a significant decrease in interhemispheric communication between the motor cortices (expressed as coherence) in MS patients compared to controls during the motor task, but not during the resting state. fNIRS assessment of interhemispheric coherence during task execution may be a useful marker in disorders with white matter damage or axonal loss, including MS.

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© 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Jon J. Jimenez ; Runze Yang ; Nabeela Nathoo ; Vishal P. Varshney ; Ali-Mohammad Golestani, et al.
"Detection of reduced interhemispheric cortical communication during task execution in multiple sclerosis patients using functional near-infrared spectroscopy", J. Biomed. Opt. 19(7), 076008 (Jul 08, 2014). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.19.7.076008


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